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For most war time Norwegians, whether king, soldier or whaler, the railway station was their point of arrival with the first 300 in June 1940.…

A popular past time in the war years, as it is today, with many games played between soldiers in exile and local clubs such as Greystone Rovers.…

The cultural centre for Norwegians in exile in the heart of Dumfries. A place of food, workshops and friendship and birthplace of the Scottish Norwegian Society.…

The first and main place of residence for many arriving into Dumfries. As numbers quickly rose it was a place of refuge and sometimes chaos.…

A frequent place of worship for many Norwegians in Dumfries and is now the site where some now rest.…

A place of worship and celebration for our Norwegian visitors with marriages from this time running through who we are today.…

As researcher on Our Norwegian Story I have been finding information and photos about Norwegians in Dumfries through interviews, books and online sources. However this story will never be ‘finished’ and I can’t wait to find out what other people still have to share.…

I have been lead artist on The Stove’s Our Norwegian Story project spending the last year finding creative ways to explore this fascinating part of Dumfries’ Story and the many ways it is relevant to us today. We have only scraped the surface…it is exciting to see where it may grow!…

Broomlands House was used as the Norwegian Officers’ Mess, and where King Haakon dined during his visit to Dumfries.…

Craigdarroch House was allocated to a special unit of the Norwegian Army for a short period during the war.…

During the war Newlands House was used as a Norwegian military hospital staffed entirely by Norwegian personnel. It was made available by permission of the owner Walter Duncan - on the condition that after the war it was returned in the same condition! On an exterior wall of the house are three plaq…

Banken - the front room of a private residence just off Troqueer Rd was used for the Norwegian bank so that money could be exchanged.…

Having developed from the oldest place of worship within Dumfries, the present Gothic Revival church was built in 1868, on the site of a previous church and close to the original Greyfriars monastery.…

The Hole in the Wall was, and still is, a place of socialising and merriment, commonplace for soldiers and residents alike.…

The roof of Duncow Primary School was rebuilt by Norwegians during the war.…

Although the interior of the former County Hotel was demolished, the eighteenth century facade is preserved and stands across the High Street from The Stove.…

The Plaza was a dance hall located in a close off the High Street, which is now closed at that end. The Plaza was only across the street from Norge Hus and during the war years became as popular with Norwegian servicemen as it was with the locals. The upright sign above the close was a feature of th…

Holm Field, now a football pitch, was used by Norwegian soldiers based at Troqueer Mill for exercises and parades. It was here that King Haakon inspected the troops during his 1940 visit.…

In 1941 the Norwegian Army moved to a larger camp they had built at Carronbridge. This was later used for training other Allied forces, including the Canadian Forestry Corps, and towards the end of the war it became POW Camp 293. In the 1970s it was almost completely dismantled.…

Garlieston in Kirkcudbrightshire was the test site for the first mobile Mulberry harbour used in the D-Day landings.…

The mansion house at Mouswald Place was used for training Norwegian officers and NCOs, but was also where some officer were billeted.…

Goldielea House was used as accomodation for Norwegian soldiers.…

RAF Dumfries airfield was opened in 1940 and for periods during the war became very active. Like other airfields across the region it was used to train pilots, and by 1945 over 400 training courses had been delivered there.…

South and Townhead Church Hall was the venue of Major Myrseth’s Folk Museum from 1950-56, and was located on Shakespeare Street at the intersection with Burns Street.…

The new theatre which Norwegians would have visited was built in 1936, replacing the 1912 Lyceum building on the same site.…

While many of the village’s own men were serving elsewhere, Moniaive became busy with Norwegian soldiers based at the two nearby estates of Craigdarroch and Maxwelton.…

Until 1966 Maxwelton House was still in the possession of the Laurie family who had it built in the seventeenth century.…

Known hometown of many of Dumfries’ Norwegian exiles.…

Formerly twinned with Dumfries, Tønsberg is a town of rich culture.…

Known whaling town with deep connections to Dumfries as the home of many of our first arrivals.…